The Benefits of Just Having Fun for Better Health & Fitness (Video)

Summer is a great time for families to have fun together. It is also a great opportunity for stroke survivors to get in some exercise in the form of leisure-time physical activity.

Those of you with a clean bill of health after your stroke, it is time to consider getting active again, or maybe for the first time.

When it comes to exercise, there’s good news in an article from the Stroke Journal of the American Heart Association; the researchers found evidence that should encourage everyone to get active. The study focused on stroke survivors and exercise, one of the first studies to do so.  Dr. Ralph Sacco and his team showed that even light leisure-time activity had measurable protective benefits for stroke survivors. In addition, there are numerous other benefits to exercise: it strengthens muscles, increases joint flexibility, improves endurance and reduces stress.

Regular exercise has well-established benefits for reducing the risk of premature death and many diseases, including cardiovascular disease. The relationship between physical activity and stroke, however, has not been as thoroughly studied as for other cardiovascular diseases. Current guidelines endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Health recommend that Americans should exercise with moderate intensity for at least 30 minutes every day.

For many stroke survivors, of course, 30 minutes is impossible, and they are left feeling that they cannot exercise hard enough or long enough to do any good. Dr. Sacco’s stroke study shows that to be a myth. It confirms that light to moderate forms of activity reduce stroke risk. Leisure-time physical activity, such as walking, or doing simple water exercises, helps reduce the risk of Ischemic stroke across multiple variables, such as age, sex, and race.

dancing“These findings are very good news for those of us who either cannot or don’t care to make exercise into a sweaty session of huffing and puffing.” Stroke survivors reduce their risk with every little bit they do, and more is better – more exercise means more reduction in risk. The study showed that protection from stroke increases with an increase in duration. Still exercise is not without risk, so talk to your doctor first. Most of the people in this study were walkers, but other activities included calisthenics and dancing. There are many activities, such as gardening, swimming, one-handed golf, bowling using a ramp (many, bowling alleys are now equipped), table tennis and the seated golf using a swivel seat cart. The bottom line is that the benefits of even small amounts of activity can provide some protection for stroke and cardiovascular disease in general.

Stroke families may have to be more creative in deciding how to involve survivors in some kind of physical activity, but don’t let that become an excuse for being a wheelchair potato. Do something, and remember, it is supposed to be for leisure. So by all means, exercise and have fun!

Source: “Leisure -Time Physical Activity and Ischemic Stroke Risk.”

Stroke Journal of the American Heart Association

Summer is a great time for families to have fun together. It is also a great opportunity for stroke survivors to get in some exercise in the form of leisure-time physical activity.

Those of you with a clean bill of health after your stroke, it is time to consider getting active again, or maybe for the first time.

Did you find the information in this article helpful? If so, please share it! 

 

Leave A Response

*

* Denotes Required Field